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Clinical Pharmacology MSc    Back

University of Aberdeen Course Type: Master taught Start Date: September
Location: Aberdeen, United Kingdom Duration: see details Fees/total cost: EUR 6,072.30 (GBP 4,500.00) - EUR 23,209.68 (GBP 17,200.00)

Description

Overview

The University of Aberdeen has been producing high quality Clinical Pharmacology graduates for over 30 years and has been at the forefront of pharmacology research for over 50 years.

Common themes throughout this MSc programme include molecular pharmacology and toxicology within the fields of disease, the drug discovery process and drug design and development. The programme will enable you to access leading academic and industry experts and provide you with valuable networking opportunities. Coupled with the skills and experience that you will gain throughout your studies, your employability and career prospects will be improved.

The MSc is ideal for recent graduates, medics and scientists, who would like to improve their career prospects, fill skills gaps and further their hands-on research experience.

We aim to provide you with:

  • An understanding of the principles of pharmacology and methods
  • An ability to apply knowledge in academic and real world health contexts
  • Opportunities to learn from world renowned researchers

What You'll Study

The information below applies to the 1 year full time / 2 year part time on campus learning MSc programme which runs in September.

Semester 1

Introduction

The taught part of our MSc Clinical Pharmacology programme extends over two terms. It consists of approximately 150 hours of lectures and 10 days of practical classes in addition to tutorials, seminars and teaching.

Over the last four months of the programme, students will undertake a project involving original research. The research will be linked to the areas of interest of the college and staff but special interests can be accommodated. The project is presented in the form of a thesis.

Compulsory Courses

Molecular Pharmacology (MT5024)

This course will cover a wide range of topics and will include revision of receptor theory and intra- and inter- cellular communication. Cancer will be used a s model disease and the molecular basis of cancer, how it is treated, clinical issues, drug resistance and chemotherapy and prevention.

Drug Metabolism & Toxicology (MT5003)

This course provides advanced level drug metabolism and includes the importance of drug transporters in the drug discovery process, dealing with molecular toxicology and pharmacology at an advanced level. Mechanisms of drug and oxidative stress and immunopharmacology are described. External experts are invited to provide their unique expertise on a range of topics which can include toxicopathology, immunotoxicology, risk assessment and an industrial perspective on the drug discovery process.

Therapeutics (MT5027)

This course will describe and review the use of medicinal compounds in man together with methods to assess and describe efficacy and toxicity. A number of exemplar disease areas and at risk populations will be selected and the drugs used to treat these conditions and populations discussed and explained. The importance of understand drug mechanisms of action and associated risk as well as benefit will be emphasised in a clinical setting. The course will consider both drugs in current use and those in development.

Applied Statistics (PU5017)

This course intends to develop the student's awareness of the fact that statistical techniques are integral to scientific research. Researchers must be able to specify a precise research question in statistical terms and then select an appropriate study design in order to carry out an effective research project. They must also be able to assess the adequacy of the research presented in scientific or medical literature. The same skills are also required for many MSc dissertation projects.

Basic Skills - Induction (MT5010)

This course is designed to provide or revise the basic skills you will require for your MSc. The course will revise basic laboratory skills and techniques and advance these to a level required to undertake graduate practical classes and projects by developing hands-on experience, competence and confidence in key laboratory skills. An expert from the library will explain the use and facilities of the library and the basics of database searching to enhance research skills and project validation.

Generic Skills (GS50M1)

This course will improve your employability skills. I-SEE (Individualised self-assessment to enhance employability) is a bespoke online resource developed to help identify your strengths and areas needing improvement. The self-assessment process allows you to identify development areas for employability skills like communication, IT and numeracy skills and personal attributes like creativity, organisation and timekeeping, flexibility, team working. This leads to automated, tailored feedback and signposting to self-study to assist in improving your CV. Reflection and an e-portfolio will assist in articulation of these enhanced skills/attributes during mock interviews. Some sessions are compulsory, but otherwise it involves self-directed learning.

Semester 2

Compulsory Courses

Pharmacovigilance (MT5501)

The will comprise lectures, tutorials and seminars. The curriculum will provide an in-depth look at pharmacovigilance using examples from both first and third world countries and will include detection of adverse drug reactions; causality assessment; prevention of adverse drug reactions including correct prescribing, prevention of drug errors and promotion of rational drug use; and communication of risk-benefit information to the general public.

Drug Development to Evidence Based Medicine (MT5502)

This course will provide you with an introduction to evidence-based medicine. It will also include a description of the elements of pharmaceutical research as well as of the drug development process.

Pharmacokinetics (MT5518)

Pharmacokinetics describe “what the body does to a drug” and thus is a central feature of applied pharmacology. The course will develop an understanding of the role that pharmacokinetics play in all aspects of drug administration, distribution, metabolism and excretion and how these effects can be modelled and predicted graphically and mathematically. Such modelling is a fundament of therapeutic regimen design, drug development, clinical pharmacology and drug safety and will be considered within all of these contexts providing a broad and relevant appreciation of the importance of pharmacokinetics to the pharmacologist.

Basic Research Methods (MT5515)

This course reviews a range of methodologies that are currently used in basic research. Experts in the various techniques describe the methodology and showcase the equipment.

Business of Science (BT5506)

This is a short introductory course to outline the basics of the commercialisation of bio scientific ideas.

The main aim of this course is to introduce you to the language of business and demystify some of the jargon that surrounds business models, intellectual property rights (IPR) and finance. This is an opportunity to understand the basics of Bio-business and the commercialisation of bioscience.

Optional Courses

Health Informatics (distance Learning) (PU5532)

We live in a time of ‘Big Data’ with the rapid growth in the digital capture of health information. Health Informatics is the science of data capture, linkage and analysis of large datasets to improve health. The demand for health researchers with training and experience in health informatics is high. For people practicing in Public Health, it is a key skill. It will equip students for any career in health research or public health practice and this course is an excellent stepping stone for those wishing to develop a specialist interest in the field.

Semester 3

Introduction

We have a dynamic research culture at the University and as part of the MSc you will undertake an original research project, supervised by a member of staff, over a period of 16 weeks. This is an excellent opportunity to carry out pioneering research, often as an active member of an existing research group. A list of proposed projects, based on the work currently being undertaken by lecturing staff, is distributed to the students early in the second half session.

Compulsory Courses

Examples of previous projects:

  • The future of detecting and treating gastric cancer
  • TB multidrug resistance – a problem that just won’t go away
  • Multi-Compartment Compliances
  • Evaluating novel inhibitors of P-glycoprotein

Research Project 2 (MT5903)

The research project is the climax of the MSc programme and involves working on an independent research project for 12 weeks prior to completion of a dissertation. It involves utilisation of much of the skills developed throughout the previous 2 semesters, and is selected based on student interests and preferences.

Masters - Part time

Start date:
September
Duration:
2 Years
Teaching method:
Face-To-Face
Language:
English
Venue:
Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Funding possible:
Yes
Tuition fees

Masters - Full time

Start date:
September
Duration:
1 Year
Teaching method:
Face-To-Face
Language:
English
Venue:
Aberdeen, United Kingdom
Funding possible:
Yes
EU-Fees:
EUR 6,072.30 (GBP 4,500.00)
Non-EU-Fees:
EUR 23,209.68 (GBP 17,200.00)
Additional Information:
Fees 2016/17
Tuition fees

Course Provider Details

Course contact information

Prof. Heather Wallace
Programme Co-ordinator
graduateschool-clsm@abdn.ac.uk
University accredited:
Last update: 24/08/2016
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